1968-1982 Power Window Motor Replacement

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Posted August 6, 2012 by Zip Corvette in Corvette Technical Articles
corvette_window_motor_lead

Here’s a project that’s fairly easy to do and only requires standard tools – nothing exotic (assuming you have a clip removal tool). The entire replacement of the power window motor should be completed in about 1.5 hours from start to finish. We needed a new power window motor so we called the good guys at Zip Corvette Parts, 8067 Fast Lane, Mechanicsville, VA 23111, 1-800-692-9632, and they fixed us up with new power window motors for both left and right sides. They also explained the changes that happened with the motors so that when we received our motor with “LH” stamped on it, we knew it went on the right side:

In the 1968 to 1976 Corvette power window motor design, GM used the same motors as the 56-67 Corvette, but they flipped them around so what was a left hand motor in a 56-67 Corvette became a right hand motor in the 68-76 Corvette, and vice versa. However, the manufacturer of the motor never changed and neither did their part number, so when you look at the right hand motor (passenger side) in a 68-77 Corvette, the motor is stamped “LH” for left hand. It is a left hand for a 56-67, but not a 68-77. This leads to confusion many times when a customer receives a new window motor that is correct, but they think it is wrong. Of course you always need to be aware of how GM determined what is left and what is right, it was from sitting in the car; RH=passenger LH=driver. Also, GM changed the electrical plug midyear 1976, so all motors produced by GM after the middle of 1976 had the new design plug. In 1978 the motor changed again, but it was only by adding a bracket to the back of the motor, the rest of the motor and the plug was the same as the late 76. The motors that are supplied now will work in all applications, but if you are installing this motor in 56-76E (E=early) then you will also need an adapter harness so that the motor will plug into the earlier harness in your Corvette. 1968-1982 Power Window Motor Replacement:

Click on the images for expanded views – it’s much easier on the eyes. 
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Step 1

01: Use a clip removal tool to release the clip that holds the lock knob on the shaft, and remove the knob.
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Step 2

02: Pull the door handle out and use a long-bladed screwdriver to remove the retaining screw, and then slide the handle off the opening mechanism.
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Step 3

03: A Philips screwdriver is required to remove the two door-pull retaining screws and the door-pull handle itself. Next remove the two lower panel retaining screws at the front and rear of the door panel as well as the upper panel retaining screw.
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Step 4

04: With all of the screws removed, the panel can be lifted off the door. Pull upwards and outwards at the same time.
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Step 5

05: The screws retaining the power window motor compartment cover are removed next.
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Step 6

06: Unplug the wiring harness from the power window motor after the compartment cover is removed.
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Step 7

07: A gear wrench will make removing the power window motor retaining bolts considerably easier that using a standard box or open end wrench. There isn’t enough room between the motor and the door skin to use a ratchet and socket.
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Step 8

08: Now it is time to remove the window motor, you must be cautious here as injury can result if you don’t follow these steps. You need to roll the window down approx half way and you will have to either feel with your finger or get a small mirror to place in the door. You are looking for a hole in the main regulator gear that will align with a hole in the main section of the regulator that bolts to the door. Once these are aligned you need to install a bolt through them and tighten it down. This will keep the regulator from moving when you remove the motor. Do not skip this step, if you remove the motor without this step you will either hurt yourself or you could even put a hole through your door. Once you have the bolt in place you can remove the three bolts that hold the motor to the regulator.
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Step 9

09: When the three motor retaining bolts are free, the motor can then be lifted out of the compartment.
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Step 10

10: The gear retainer plate (in my right hand) will mount on the outside of the window regulator, while the motor with gear will mount on the inside of it. This is a bit tricky, since you’ll have to align everything by feel rather than by sight.
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Step 11

11: You can use a screwdriver to provide some lift and support for the motor while you start the bolts with your fingers. Once started, snug them up with the gear wrench until tight.
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Step 12

12: Plug the harness back into the new window motor. It’s a good idea to turn on the ignition key and check the operation of the motor at this point before you get everything buttoned-up.
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Step 13

13: When everything checks out OK, reinstall the motor compartment cover with the screws removed earlier.
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Step 14

14: Put the door panel back on and reinstall the retaining screws as well as the door release handle.
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Step 15

15: The door-pull handle is installed next, and finally the lock knob. Press on the knob until you hear the retaining clip click on the shaft. That’s it – job completed.
1968-1982 Corvette Window Motor: How To Replace Power Window Motors On Your Corvette

Source: Zip Corvette Parts
8067 Fast Lane | Mechanicsville, VA 23111 | (800) 962-9632


About the Author

Zip Corvette


One Comment


  1.  
    Tony

    Excellent…. well detailed how to. This really helped me complete both window motors correctly.
    Just a further note. You should order from Zip Corvette the left and right side power door lock pigtails. Mine were brittle and fell apart upon re assembly of the door. 33 years of use isn’t kind to fiberboard. Ha!





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